Risking

 Courtesy of pexels.com

Courtesy of pexels.com

A ceramics professor announced different grading systems to his two pottery classes. He surprised the students in his first class by telling them that they only had to turn in ONE pot during the whole semester. Their entire course grade would be based on the quality of that one pot. In his second class, he informed the students that their grade would be based on quantity rather than quality. If they turned in fifty pots, they would receive an “A”; forty pots for a "B", etc.

Not surprisingly, his two classes took very different approaches. The students in his first class spent the whole semester trying to make the perfect pot. The second class churned out pots in record numbers.

At the end of the semester, the professor began assigning final grades. First, he assigned course grades to the single-pot class. As he began counting the pots from the second class, he suddenly stopped… Dumbfounded. He didn’t find what he expected to find. He was afraid he would receive garbage from his second class, but their pots were much better than the first class!

What would explain this? The professor pondered and then realized that, compared to his first class, the students from the second class made far more mistakes in their effort to make fifty pots, but they had obviously learned valuable lessons from their mistakes. They became far better potters.

Here is the professor’s grand conclusion: “The people in my first class did not become great potters, because they hadn’t failed enough."

If you want to be successful, you’ve got to be willing to get out there and take your lumps. You’ve got to fail enough that you learn how to be a success. Are you willing to do that? If you are not willing to fail, you actually prevent yourself from achieving the kind of success you are capable of.


If you want to be successful, you’ve got to be willing to get out there and take your lumps. You’ve got to fail enough that you learn how to be a success.
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